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Minds made feeble the myth and legacy of the Kallikaks by J. David Smith

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Published by Aspen Systems Corp. in Rockville, Md .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Goddard, Henry Herbert, 1866-1957.,
  • Eugenics.,
  • Mental retardation.,
  • Heredity, Human.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesKallikaks.
StatementJ. David Smith.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHQ755.35 .S65 1985
The Physical Object
Paginationxv, 205 p. :
Number of Pages205
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2865325M
ISBN 100871890933
LC Control Number84028416

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Rockville, MD: Aspen, pages. The Kallikak family was used in the early 20th century to support eugenics--the idea that 'bad' blood would diminish the human species. The author explores the original publications about the Kallikaks and tracks down the family's modern decendants. First edition (first printing). A very good copy in a very good dust jacket. An illustration of an open book. Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk. Minds made feeble: the myth and legacy of the Kallikaks by Smith, J. David, Publication date TopicsPages:   Minds Made Feeble by J. David Smith, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(9). Click to read more about Minds made feeble: the myth and legacy of the Kallikaks by J. David Smith. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers2/5.

But the book's real strength lies in Smith's quiet assurance as he unfolds the records of conversations and notes from the Vineland, N.J., school which, with its companion institution across the street, was to be Deborah Kallikak's home for 81 years: it was there she was banished at age 8, upon her mother's marriage to a man who wanted no part. Minds Made Feeble: The Myth and Legacy of the Kallikaks Paperback – 1 March by J. David Smith (Author) out of 5 stars 1 rating. See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Amazon Price New from Used from Paperback, 1 March "Please retry" — — — 4/5(1). Thou ill-form'd offspring of my feeble brain, / Who after birth did'st by my side remain, / Till snatcht from thence by friends, less wise than true, / Who thee abroad expos'd to. You can only change someone's mind if you provide them with a platform to speak it. Submit content to Minds+ and earn a share of revenue. Minds+ is a new model for creators and brands to gain exposure and monetize their content. Our monthly revenue is shared directly with the creators who contribute the most popular and engaging exclusive.

Minds made feeble: The myth and legacy of the Kallikaks. Rockville, MD: Aspen. Zenderland, L. (). Measuring minds: Henry Herbert Goddard and the origins of American intelligence testing. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press. Written by Amber Esping, Kwame Dakwa, and Jonathan Plucker. The term feeble-minded was used from the late nineteenth century in Europe, the United States and Australasia for disorders later referred to as illnesses or deficiencies of the mind.. At the time, mental deficiency encompassed all degrees of educational and social deficiency. Within the concept of mental deficiency, researchers established a hierarchy, ranging from idiocy, at the most severe. MINDS MADE FEEBLE: The Myth and Legacy of the Kallikaks But the book's real strength lies in Smith's quiet assurance as he unfolds the records of conversations and notes from the Vineland, N.J., school which, with its companion institution across the street, was to be Deborah Kallikak's home for 81 years: it was there she was banished at. James W. Trent uses public documents, private letters, investigative reports, and rare photographs to explore our changing perceptions of mental retardation over the past years. He contends that the economic vulnerability of mentally retarded people (and their families), more than the claims made for their intellectual or social limitations, has determined their institutional treatment.5/5(1).